Four Fundamentals for Building a High-Performing Team

Managing an effective team requires several competencies and begins with the core values of the leader. These values set the tone for what’s needed to perform at a high level. Leaders must establish expectations from the beginning with their team. It’s key for you to outline what’s expected of your team and how you plan to hold them accountable.
As you begin to build your team, finding out what motivates them and which levers to pull will be key to driving higher performance. As a leader, you need to provide your team clear direction, a roadmap, and support and ensure they understand their growth potential. As a leader, there are four building blocks to consider in building and managing a high-performing team:

1.Culture

Culture is something that you can’t always see, but you can feel it. It’s often in the intangibles, the little things. Building a culture starts with building a TEAM, itself. It’s important to create an environment where everyone can thrive and be collaborative. Establish opportunities for your team to work together and understand each other’s roles right off the bat. These projects will help galvanize the group. Part of a performance culture is setting up a winning mentality. Confidence breeds success, and the more wins your team can attain, the faster you create a culture of winning. This also allows employees to gain ownership over their success. No matter the field of work, everyone wants to be part of a winning team and have ownership in it. So, establish some easy wins for your team!

2. Accountability

Accountability, like culture, must be instituted from the outset. Accountability is being consistent—consistent in your actions and your words. Lead by example – do what you say you’re going to do, and your team will, too. Setting clear and attainable goals is equally important to maintain and cultivate the buy-in culture you are trying to establish. Furthermore, when you set expectations, it is imperative to assess what you expect and provide timely feedback. This should be done through regular one-on-one meetings as well as throughout the day. Be sure to provide positive feedback on the activities your team is doing well. This will lend more weight when you must focus on areas of improvement – which is often more difficult to deliver, but important in terms of development and growth.

3. Motivation

Finding out what makes each of your team members tick is critical to creating a high-performing environment. As a leader, you will be part cheerleader, part coach, and even sometimes part psychologist. Finding out what motivates each individual is how you will unlock a higher level of performance from your group. Utilize one-on-one meetings to engage and learn more about your colleagues. Motivation can come in many forms, whether it is professional advancement, monetary gain, or the love of competition. As a sales manager, I create excitement and healthy competition amongst the group. You must give your team a reason to come to work, beyond the paycheck, if you want to see their performance increase.

4. Development

Developing your employee’s skillsets so they can perform the best in their current role and challenging them with stretch assignments is a major piece of team building. As a leader or coach, it’s important to look at each day as an improvement opportunity for yourself and your team. Identifying potential leaders within a team is key to an organization sustaining a competitive edge. You cultivate these individuals by delegating tasks, creating open forums for ideas, and communicating your vision of a collaborative structure. Challenge your employees, provide them an opportunity to step up and take on leadership responsibilities. Not only does this reinforce your confidence in them, but it also gives them a sense of what a leadership role entails. The open forum provides a space where each of your employees have a voice and can be heard. It also allows them to take ownership in the team’s endeavors and/or demonstrate leadership amongst their peers.

Everyone will have different ways to lead a team, but these four core tenets transcend across industries. Ultimately, communicating a clear vision is paramount to gaining buy-in. You need everyone pulling the rope in the same direction to achieve an exceptional level of performance. 

For help building and developing a high-performing team, trust Consult YHN’s industry-leading HR & Recruiting Solutions. Talk to your Account Manager or contact Recruiting@ConsultYHN.com today!

About the Author

Robert Strother has been the Inside Sales Director at Consult YHN since 2016 and has over 10 years of sales leadership experience. In that time, he has led high performing sales teams across an array of industries and developed multiple future sales leaders.

Four Steps to Create a Dream Team

The most important asset that you have as a business owner/manager is the people that work for you. The lesson I’ve learned from any underdog sports movie (i.e. The Mighty Ducks, Dodgeball, Cool Runnings, Step Up 2, should I keep going?) is that you can take a ragtag group of misfits and turn them into winners as long as they have the right attitude, an intense training montage, plus a leader and/or purpose that motivates them. But it doesn’t just happen in the movies—I’ve seen it done in clinics all over the country.
Here’s what it takes to build your own dream team right in your own practice (no sports equipment or rigorous physical activity required):

Step #1: Hire for capability and train for competency

This is the “attitude” element of our underdog team analogy. Soft skills like emotional intelligence and the ability to make good decisions are paramount to professional success. Regulating emotions and correctly interpreting the verbal and nonverbal behaviors of others is a key strength in building rapport and trust with patients. According to LinkedIn’s 2019 Workplace Learning Report, 57 percent of senior leaders say soft skills are more important than hard skills. An employee with a growth mindset has the capability for lifelong learning, which is at the core of agility, flexibility, and innovation. Training for competency comes in at Step 3.

Step #2: Communicate, communicate, communicate!

Vision – Share the company’s purpose. Make sure every employee understands the company’s mission, values, and vision. Working from a shared philosophy for a common cause gets people excited about their jobs. When should you do this? I’d recommend annually or semi-annually during a company meeting.

Expectations – The behaviors and outcomes that you want from your staff must be spelled out, in writing. There are two reasons for this. First, they can’t read your mind. Second, they probably aren’t going to remember a passing conversation that took place between seeing patients and/or answering phone calls. Let’s face it, most of us can’t remember what we ate for dinner two days ago or even how old we are (admit it—you have to pause and think about it for a second). Expectation conversations can be kicked-off during a company meeting and then should be reinforced during one-on-one meetings between your staff and their direct supervisor. If your practice doesn’t have designated direct supervisors, it needs to be defined – even if it’s that two employees officially report to the business owner.

Feedback – Feedback must be behavior-based and timely. Provide it the moment that it’s applicable (if appropriate) or shortly thereafter. Changing behaviors in your staff is kind of like raising kids. We must be patient, we must be consistent, and most importantly, we must look in the mirror to consider which of their behaviors might be reflections of our own (eek!). My four-year-old is notoriously bossy. At any hour of the day, I may hear her walk into the kitchen and demand: “I’m thirsty. I need milk!” My routine feedback (after a deep breath) is always, “Don’t you mean; ‘May I please have some milk?’” It didn’t take a sit-down feedback session, but she knows that I believe there is a better way to handle the request. So, if you observe an opportunity to make suggestions for improved behaviors, do so while the situation is fresh in both of your minds (but not in front of others—embarrassing someone is bad for morale). These verbal feedback opportunities can be reinforced with written reminders or formal performance reviews as well.

Accountability – The best tool for accountability is a Daily Huddle when everyone on the team comes together to discuss how they will pull their weight in accomplishing the businesses’ overall mission/goals that day. Those underdog teams who end up victorious don’t adopt an ‘every man for himself’ attitude—they rally together before every play/inning/period to talk about each person’s role and how they’ll work together. Your business’ day should be no different.

Step #3: Invest in employee development

Developing your people doesn’t have to be a significant monetary investment. It could mean setting aside the time to allow them to take advantage of Consult’s Telelearning and Employee Development Programs (EDPs). When they take part in training courses, ask them to come back and report on at least one takeaway from the session. If you’re expecting them to change behaviors post-training, encouraging continuous long-term improvements is a better strategy than expecting radical overnight success. If you hire the right people with a growth mindset, you can train them to do the job the way that you want them to do it.

Step #4: Recognize accomplishments (big and small)

When your staff does something right, don’t let it go unrecognized. Remember my daughter’s demanding ways and the immediate feedback that I’ve been giving her? Well, there’s hope for her yet. Now when she walks into the kitchen, four out of five times she’ll say, “Mommy, may I please have some milk?” To which I respond: “Thank you for asking so nicely, yes you may!” With that one sentence, I’ve given feedback, recognized her accomplishment, and made her feel good about herself, therefore increasing the likelihood of her continuing to behave in this manner. How do you apply that to your staff? Perhaps you might buy the office lunch if they meet the prior month’s sales goal. Or it could be as simple as saying, “I heard how you handled that phone call. You do a great job representing us over the phone. Thank you, keep it up!”

You might be thinking ‘four steps – easier said than done.’ The good news is that you don’t have to do it alone. The details within all of these steps are what the Consult YHN Account Managers help practices with every day. So, if I could add one final step it would be:

Step #5:  Ask for help! That is why we’re here, after all.

About the Author

Ridgely Samuel joined Consult YHN in 2005. She has held several positions within the sales and operations teams but has found her passion for developing others in her current role as a Training Manager. Ridgely has experience working as a financial analyst for a former Fortune 500 company, holds a degree in Business Administration from Wake Forest University, and is a certified Six Sigma Green Belt. When she’s not working or acting as a chauffeur for her two daughters, Ridgely can be found relaxing in a hammock with a novel, tossing tennis balls for her dog, or paddleboarding on the lake.

2019 Year-in-Review

As we embark on a new decade, we took a moment to appreciate the past year. Together, we accomplished a lot. Join us in celebrating some of our best moments.
Thank you for your continued partnership. We look forward to an even more productive and prosperous 2020!

About the Author

Julia Shreckengast joined Consult YHN in 2015 and serves as Marketing Account Executive, providing support to Associates by managing creative projects and developing/executing marketing plans. Prior to joining Consult YHN, she helped promote the city of New Orleans as a member of the New Orleans Tourism Marketing Corporation. Julia graduated Cum Laude with a bachelor’s degree in marketing from Tulane University.

Four Ways to Inspire & Motivate Your Staff

Is your team happy, productive, and motivated? Do they care about what they do and what the company stands for? Unengaged employees are a common problem for any type of business in any industry.

In fact, according to Gallup’s “State of the American Workplace” Report, over half of the U.S. workforce is not engaged. In other words, over 50 percent of current employees are unhappy with their current job and are actively looking for a new one.

If this doesn’t seem like a big deal, then consider these statistics: organizations with higher than average employee engagement realize 27 percent higher profits, 50 percent higher sales, and 50 percent higher customer loyalty levels.

So, as a manager, what can you do?

When it comes down to it, you can’t make people care. You can, however, inspire them to think differently about your business and the work that they do.

Here are four ways you can effectively inspire and motivate your team:

1. Evangelize company goals and values.

Make sure your employees understand what your vision is and what you’re trying to accomplish. If you communicate to them why you do what you do, they are more likely to treat the company as if it is their own. Show them their purpose and how it affects the business. Also, include your employees in your decision-making. Asking for a person’s input or opinion can give him/her a greater sense of belonging and help foster a culture of collaboration.

2. Incentivize and encourage them.

Show appreciation for employees that work hard and reward them for a job well done. Employees want to know that their work is acknowledged and valued. Offer constructive criticism to staff members when needed along with support to make changes so that you continue to boost their confidence. Consider putting a reward plan in place so that your employees have clear goals and something to work towards. Statistics show that this could increase employee performance by as much as 44 percent! Organizations that offer some sort of recognition program also have a lower turnover rate.

3. Invest in their professional growth.

Discover what’s important to your employees. This sends a clear message that you care about their future, not only with the company but in their professional career. More importantly, offer your staff periodic training opportunities that will strengthen the skills needed to thrive in their current roles or to advance within the company, such as Consult YHN’s weekly teletrainings and Employee Development Program (EDP) classes. Some of our practices will also offer tuition reimbursement to employees who want to continue their education. All of this helps to create “promotable” employees and, in turn, helps you save money in the long run.

4. Trust them.

Micromanaging is counterproductive. Have faith in your team’s abilities (that’s why you hired them in the first place!). It sounds so simple, but your trust has the potential to boost engagement, increase productivity, improve communication, build team spirit, and encourage employee advocacy. Cross-train your staff so that they have the opportunity to take on greater responsibilities in the future. Allow for mistakes, correct them, then step back and see how your employees manage without direct supervision.

Finally, don’t forget that Consult YHN offers industry-leading employee development and recruiting services that can help you build an engaged and high-performing team.

Ask your Account Manager for more information or contact our Recruiting Department today at RecruitingServices@ConsultYHN.com.

About the Author

Jason DiOttavio joined Consult YHN as a Corporate Recruiter in 2011. Previously, he worked as an agency recruiter for a staffing firm specializing in IT/Administrative roles including such large companies as Dietz & Watson. When not working, Jason enjoys spending time with his wife and young daughter. He’s also obsessed with cooking shows and finding new ice cream and donut shops.

The 5 Keys to Successful Hiring

Every business owner is excited about growth. You’ve cultivated and nurtured your practice well, have done all the right things and are ready to take it to the next level. This usually involves expanding your staff and that means investing in additional human capital – hiring.

Small business owners don’t hire new employees every day and the thought of screening, interviewing, and selecting employees can be daunting. But if you pay attention to these five keys, you will maximize your chances of attracting and developing the best new talent for your practice.

 

1. Know what you are looking for

Preparation is always a strong precursor to success. Invest the time to understand the role you’re looking to fill as it relates to the skills necessary to do the job (think of skills as the things we all learn—both through work experience and formal education) and think about how to test and vet those skills. In addition to skills, you should also consider a candidate’s attributes or traits. These are the qualities that are “hard-wired” into a person’s DNA. While most skills can be taught or developed it can be very difficult to develop a person’s attributes. Finally, think about the culture you have and how a candidate will fit into that culture.

 

2. Always be on the lookout for talent

Once you know what you need, you may find yourself assessing everyone you meet. That’s a good thing. Leverage relationships, chance encounters, and business meetings. You never know where you may find your next star employee.

 

3. Listen

You should not be doing most of the talking in an interview. Sometimes we concentrate too much on the information we want to provide and not enough on getting the information we need. Asking good questions becomes meaningless if we are not listening to the answers and asking good follow-up questions.

 

4. Think about WHY someone would want to come to work for you

Unemployment is as low as its been in a long time. Talented candidates will have multiple options. Be ready to promote your practice as an employer of choice. You should always have a great answer when a candidate asks, “Why should I come to work for you?”

 

5. Take the time to onboard

Even if you execute the above items flawlessly it won’t matter if you don’t take the time to onboard new employees. Remember to set expectations, model great behavior, provide a lot of feedback, and coach your employees.
Follow these guidelines and you’ll maximize your chances hiring and retaining the best talent out there!

Of course, if you need a partner in guiding you through the process, trust the experts in hearing healthcare recruiting—Consult YHN’s recruiters!

About the Author

Ernie Paolini is responsible for Human Resources and Recruiting Services at Consult YHN. He has more than 20 years of experience in building and managing technology-driven HR and recruitment organizations. His areas of expertise include behavioral interviewing, employee relations, compliance, and onboarding.